Re: WHAT DO YOUR STUDENTS ALREADY KNOW?

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT FOR THEM TO LEARN IT?
Finally, it is useful to reflect on the decisions you have made about what to teach and to articulate your rationale. Obviously, if you can’t find something compelling to say about the importance, significance, or utility of the material at hand, you can’t expect your students to see the relevance either. Having a clear rationale may help motivate student learning as well. Examining and thinking about these relationships can give strength and substance to your planning and consequently to everything you do in the classroom.
Once you have a general map for where you are going and your rationale for going there, you can begin to fill in the details of how you are going to get there and what you will take note of along the way. The precise combination of methods, examples, and sequential order in a session plan is guided by many principles, including your students, your subject matter, and the materials and classroom space available to you. How extensive and detailed your plan needs to be is largely a matter of personal choice. Again, remember that the plan is not a script; in fact, you are the primary audience for the plan, not your students. Let the following questions guide you reflections and planning.

TRAINYOUCAN NETWORK ONLINE STATUS